Advantages and disadvantages of topical route of drug administration pdf

Posted on Saturday, June 12, 2021 6:04:27 PM Posted by Sven V. - 12.06.2021 and pdf, free pdf 4 Comments

advantages and disadvantages of topical route of drug administration pdf

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Before administering a medicine, it is important to understand the benefits and limitation of the routes of administration.

Topical route of drug administration refers to the application of medication to the surface of the skin or mucous membrane of the eye, ear, nose, mouth, vagina, etc. Drugs for topical application are usually available as creams, ointments, gels, lotions, sprays, powders , aerosols, liniments, and drops. Topical route of administration provides a high local concentration of the drug without affecting the general circulation. However, absorption into the systemic circulation is very common and can lead to adverse effects.

Routes of Drug Administration

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Topical Route of Drug Administration: Advantages and Disadvantages

A diverse range of dosage forms and delivery systems has been developed to provide for the care and welfare of animals. The development of dosage forms draws on the discipline of biopharmaceutics, which integrates an understanding of formulations, dissolution, stability, and controlled release pharmaceutics ; absorption, distribution, metabolism, and excretion pharmacokinetics, PK ; concentration-effect relationships and drug-receptor interactions pharmacodynamics, PD ; and treatment of the disease state therapeutics. Formulation of a dosage form typically involves combining an active ingredient and one or more excipients; the resultant dosage form determines the route of administration and the clinical efficacy and safety of the drug. Optimization of drug doses is also critical to achieving clinical efficacy and safety. The PK and PD phases are linked by the premise that free drug in the systemic circulation is in equilibrium with the receptors. The PD phase generally involves interaction of the drug with a receptor, which triggers post-receptor events and eventually leads to a drug effect see Drug Concentration and Effect. Drug delivery strategies for veterinary formulations are complicated by the diversity of species and breeds treated, the wide range in body sizes, different husbandry practices, seasonal variations, cost constraints associated with the value of the animal being treated, the persistence of residues in food and fiber see Chemical Residues in Food and Fiber , and the level of convenience, among other factors.

Given by injection into a vein intravenously, IV , into a muscle intramuscularly, IM , into the space around the spinal cord intrathecally , or beneath the skin subcutaneously, sc. Breathed into the lungs, usually through the mouth by inhalation or mouth and nose by nebulization. See also Introduction to Administration and Kinetics of Drugs. Many drugs can be administered orally as liquids, capsules, tablets, or chewable tablets. Because the oral route is the most convenient and usually the safest and least expensive, it is the one most often used.

Topical route of drug administration refers to the application of medication to the surface of the skin or mucous membrane of the eye, ear, nose, mouth, vagina, etc. Drugs for topical application are usually available as creams, ointments, gels, lotions, sprays, powders , aerosols, liniments, and drops. Topical route of administration provides a high local concentration of the drug without affecting the general circulation. However, absorption into the systemic circulation is very common and can lead to adverse effects. Sometimes, this systemic absorption is made use of, for its therapeutic value. Useful for local delivery of agents, particularly those which have toxic effects if administered systemically. Avoidance of first pass metabolism.

Routes of Drug Administration

The mouth route is the most commonly used route of drug administration due to the ease in which the drugs can be taken. A list of commonly used routes of drug administration can be found below, along with useful information about dosage and abbreviations. Pain not occurs because injection is not used.

In this guide, we summarise the most common routes used to administer drugs, the advantages and disadvantages of each drug route and examples of dosage forms that are used to deliver the active drug to the intended site of action in the body. Oral Route 2. Sublingual Route 3.

Topical Route of Drug Administration: Advantages and Disadvantages

In this guide, we summarise the most common routes used to administer drugs, the advantages and disadvantages of each drug route and examples of dosage forms that are used to deliver the active drug to the intended site of action in the body. Oral Route 2. Sublingual Route 3. Buccal Route 4. Intravenous Route 5.

In this guide, we summarise the most common routes used to administer drugs, the advantages and disadvantages of each drug route and examples of dosage forms that are used to deliver the active drug to the intended site of action in the body. Oral Route 2. Sublingual Route 3. Buccal Route 4. Intravenous Route 5. Intramuscular Route 6. Subcutaneous Route 7.

A topical medication is a medication that is applied to a particular place on or in the body. Most often topical administration means application to body surfaces such as the skin or mucous membranes to treat ailments via a large range of classes including creams , foams , gels , lotions , and ointments. Topical medications may also be inhalational , such as asthma medications , or applied to the surface of tissues other than the skin, such as eye drops applied to the conjunctiva , or ear drops placed in the ear, or medications applied to the surface of a tooth. The definition of the topical route of administration sometimes states that both the application location and the pharmacodynamic effect thereof is local. In other cases, topical is defined as applied to a localized area of the body or to the surface of a body part regardless of the location of the effect. Such medications are generally hydrophobic chemicals, such as steroid hormones. Specific types include transdermal patches which have become a popular means of administering some drugs for birth control , hormone replacement therapy , and prevention of motion sickness.


Table 1: Pros and cons of different routes of drug administration. Route. Advantages. Disadvantages. Oral. • Easy. • Preferred by patients. • “Slow-release​”.


Topical Route of Drug Administration: Advantages and Disadvantages

COMMENT 4

  • Topical route of drug administration refers to the application of medication to the surface of the skin or mucous membrane of the eye, ear, nose, mouth, vagina, etc. Natasha J. - 15.06.2021 at 15:57
  • Slideshare uses cookies to improve functionality and performance, and to provide you with relevant advertising. Subsmertoibou - 17.06.2021 at 22:30
  • In this guide, we summarise the most common routes used to administer drugs, the advantages and disadvantages of each drug route and examples of dosage forms that are used to deliver the active drug to the intended site of action in the body. Elvis B. - 18.06.2021 at 14:02
  • What are the advantages and disadvantages of topical antibiotics in the treatment of impetigo? Low risk of systemic adverse events and drug interactions. Higher concentration of the antibiotic when applied to the affected area. Smaller amount of drug is used. Lack of effect on intestinal florae. Low cost. Christelle L. - 19.06.2021 at 02:49

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