Victoria and abdul by shrabani basu pdf

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victoria and abdul by shrabani basu pdf

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By Beth Accomando. The new film "Victoria and Abdul" looks to the unlikely friendship between Queen Victoria and her Indian servant. The new film " Victoria and Abdul " looks to the unlikely friendship between Queen Victoria and her Indian servant.

Victoria and Abdul: The True Story of the Queen's Closest Confidant

Goodreads helps you keep track of books you want to read. Want to Read saving…. Want to Read Currently Reading Read. Other editions. Enlarge cover. Error rating book. Refresh and try again. Open Preview See a Problem?

Details if other :. Thanks for telling us about the problem. Return to Book Page. Preview — Victoria and Abdul by Shrabani Basu. The tall, handsome Abdul Karim was just twenty-four years old when he arrived in England from Agra to wait at tables during Queen Victoria's Golden Jubilee.

An assistant clerk at Agra Central Jail, he suddenly found himself a personal attendant to the Empress of India herself. Within a year, he was established as a powerful figure at court, becoming the queen's teacher, or The tall, handsome Abdul Karim was just twenty-four years old when he arrived in England from Agra to wait at tables during Queen Victoria's Golden Jubilee.

Within a year, he was established as a powerful figure at court, becoming the queen's teacher, or Munshi, and instructing her in Urdu and Indian affairs.

Devastated by the death of John Brown, her Scottish gillie, the queen had at last found his replacement. But her intense and controversial relationship with the Munshi led to a near-revolt in the royal household. Yet, at its heart, it is a tender love story between an ordinary Indian and his elderly queen, a relationship that survived the best attempts to destroy it.

Get A Copy. Hardcover , pages. More Details Other Editions Friend Reviews. To see what your friends thought of this book, please sign up. To ask other readers questions about Victoria and Abdul , please sign up. Lists with This Book. Community Reviews.

Showing Average rating 3. Rating details. More filters. Sort order. I could walk through my garden forever. Abdul Karim was just a young man when he first met the British monarch, Queen Victoria and since that day, till the day, the queen died, their friendship stayed invaluable and that reached beyond the walls of Osborne House to Buckingham Palace to India thereby creating an uproar amongst the royals and the British Empire.

Very predictably, after the death of the Queen, her family erased every single proof of the Queen and her munshi's friendship, yet somehow and mostly through hard work, dedication and by miracle, author, Shrabani Basu, has successfully resurrected the forgotten Indian Muslim man who became an integral part of Queen Victoria's life through this memoir.

Synopsis: Tall and handsome Abdul was just twenty-four years old when he arrived in England from Agra to wait at tables for Queen Victoria's Golden Jubilee. Within a year, Abdul had grown to become a powerful figure at court, the Queen's teacher, or Munshi, her counsel on Urdu and Indian affairs, and a friend close to the Queen's heart.

Devastated first by the death of Prince Albert in and then her personal servant John Brown in , Queen Victoria quickly found joy in an intense and controversial relationship with her Munshi, who traveled everywhere with her, cooked her curries and cultivated her understanding of the Indian sub-continent--a region, as Empress of India, she was long intrigued by but could never visit.

The royal household roiled with resentment, but their devotion grew in defiance of all expectation and the societal pressures of their time and class and lasted until the Queen's death on January 22, To present a mohar a golden coin commissioned by the then Indian government , Abdul Karim and Mohammed Buksh, two Indian clerks were summoned upon by the British Empire.

Upon presenting the mohar on Queen's Golden Jubilee celebration at England, Abdul Karim instantly catches the eye of the aging, mournful and bored Queen Victoria, who along with his partner, Buksh, were immediately hired by the royal household as servants to serve the queen.

Gradually, Karim rises above his pay-grade and status as a servant to be the Queen's Munshi by charming and impressing her with his deep knowledge about India, its history, religions and cultures that the Queen found to be extremely enlightening. Not only that, Karim learns to win the trust of the queen, who considered him as a close confidant amongst the English servants as well as her own family who are constantly spying upon her. Even though their friendship irked everyone in the royal household yet the Queen was hell-bound on making Munshi a permanent member of her family by inviting his wife as well as other members of Karim's family to live in the palatial complex where the Queen's previous royal servant stayed, with whom too she formed a close bond of love and friendship.

Eventually, through ups and downs and through many challenges and battles, their friendship survived and grew more strong with each passing day, until the day the Queen breathed for the last time.

Immediately, the Munshi along with his family was thrown out of England and also burned all the letters and photographs that were exchanged between the two, in order to erase any proof of their friendship from the face of the world.

But history and truth can't be erased, as Shrabani Basu pens this memoir with honesty and enough justice about the forgotten man who was Queen Victoria's best friend in her later years. The author' writing style is extremely articulate and often elegant enough to peak the readers' interest all through out.

The plot is not only laced with well-researched facts, but also with emotions that will strike the readers while reading about Karim's enlightening journey. The narrative in the book is light and free-flowing. The pacing is bit slow, since the author has penned the memoir with lots of depth that will let the readers form a clear perspective about the characters portrayed in this memoir, besides the Munshi.

The real life characters from the past are heavily well-researched and well developed, especially the Queen and her Munshi, who are bound to come alive right before the eyes of the readers, while they are reading the book. Also the background details of the Osborne House where the Queen resided is intricately and vividly painted through the memoir and the readers will be able to precept the background along with the scenes very easily.

Since its a historical memoir based on facts and dates, the author has managed to lace this memoir with light humor now and then, to keep things thoroughly interesting and subtly funny.

The friendship that quickly developed between the Queen and her Munshi is very much well arrested by the author. Also the family life of Karim in India too is well described in the book, thereby letting the readers take a peak in to this knowledgeable man's background. Basu did a great work to keep the memory of this man safe which was forgotten by the British as well as the Indians after the death of the Queen, thereby giving a full and proper justice to this humble, well informed and handsome's life.

In a nutshell, this is a must read enlightening and poignant book that must be read by every Indians, to learn how an Indian, who were then despised by the British, won the heart of the ultimate emperor of India by narrating her the rich tales of Indian history and culture. Verdict: A truly and deeply moving memoir of the blissful friendship between Queen Victoria and her Munshi, Abdul Karim. Courtesy: Thanks to the publishers from Bloomsbury India for giving me the opportunity to read and review this book.

View all 11 comments. Mar 15, Wanda rated it really liked it Shelves: biography-memoirs , read-in , non-fiction , public-library. I saw the film based on this book last year and really enjoyed it, but I had to wonder how much the screenwriters had fiddled with the facts to make a more engaging film.

I had no idea until seeing the film that she had Indian people serving in her household or that she had become close friends with one of them. In many ways, this is a story of a lonely woman who finds a friend and a new interest in life.

I would agree with the author, that Her Maj was a romantic at heart and the exoticness of India in comparison to Britain was what drew her to Abdul Karim and his culture. I was impressed by her devotion to the study of Urdu and her proficiency in that language at the end of her life—she got a late start, but made excellent headway on a language that was far different than others she was used to.

As Abdul became one of her favourites, it was inevitable that he would become the target of people who were jealous. The Queen believed much of the rivalry to be a result of racism, and I would have to agree with her assessment. If Abdul had been a white man like John Brown , there would still have been resentment, but not the volcanic rage that seemed to permeate the Royal Household regarding this Indian man.

It must have been a very lonely life for Abdul, as well, with the other Indians begrudging him his relationship with the Queen, not to mention the hatred of the Caucasian members of staff.

Regarding the film versus the book, I think the film stayed pretty true to the facts. Overall, I would say that I enjoyed the film more.

An interesting window into the life of an intriguing woman. View all 3 comments. Mar 16, Chrissie rated it liked it Shelves: italy , leaders , great-britain , india , france , bio , audible-uk , germany , read , history. The British royal family tried to erase Abdul Karim, Queen Victoria's devoted Hindustani instructor and adviser in Indian affairs from history, and yet they failed to succeed!

This is quite a story! Read about him here. Yet the book needs better editing. Portions are tedious. The text is repetitive. Quotes are excessive. For example, the long sentences of U The British royal family tried to erase Abdul Karim, Queen Victoria's devoted Hindustani instructor and adviser in Indian affairs from history, and yet they failed to succeed!

For example, the long sentences of Urdu need not have been included. The audiobook version performed by Elizabeth Jusicki is clear.

The pace at which it is read is however exceedingly slow. This is the first time I have found it necessary to adjust the speed to 1. View all 10 comments. I totally enjoyed this book and learned a lot about the interaction of the British royalty regarding the people of India and how Victoria ruled them. I understand this is to be a movie soon and I did find the writing and the experiences portrayed to be engrossing and interesting. We know so much about Queen Victoria and yet this very important facet of her life has been in a sense under reported.

Victoria developed an engrossing relationship with Abdul while incensing her staff, her family and t I totally enjoyed this book and learned a lot about the interaction of the British royalty regarding the people of India and how Victoria ruled them. Victoria developed an engrossing relationship with Abdul while incensing her staff, her family and those around her. Her care and concern for Abdul seemed limitless, while her family and her staffs' inability to accept him and those of his kind made for a disquieting read into racial equality and its worth in Victorian England.

Both main characters were charismatic. They infused each other with confidence and importance and developed an intense friendship which nothing was able to penetrate as hard as some tried to break it apart.

It was sad to read of Abdul's demise in standing following Victoria's death and how his life of privilege while being nourished in the bosom of Victoria turned against him when she died.

Victoria & Abdul (Movie Tie-in): The True Story of the Queen's Closest Confidant

Look Inside. Aug 29, Minutes Buy. In the twilight years of her reign, after the devastating deaths of her two great loves—Prince Albert and John Brown—Queen Victoria meets tall and handsome Abdul Karim, a humble servant from Agra waiting tables at her Golden Jubilee. In the twilight years of her reign, after the devastating deaths of hertwo great loves—Prince Albert and John Brown—Queen Victoria meets tall and handsome Abdul Karim, a humble servant from Agra waiting tables at her Golden Jubilee. One of the great love stories of all time. Find books coming soon in

Please type in your email address in order to receive an email with instructions on how to reset your password. In the twilight years of her reign, after the devastating deaths of her two great loves—Prince Albert and John Brown—Queen Victoria meets tall and handsome Abdul Karim, a humble servant from Agra waiting tables at her Golden Jubilee. Boring history lesson although I did listen to the end. This book was excellent and the narrator was excellent too. I would highly recommend it. Boring so far.

Previously undiscovered diaries have been found by an author based in the UK which show the intense relationship between Queen Victoria and the Indian man employed to be her teacher. The diaries have been used by London-based author Shrabani Basu to update her book Victoria and Abdul - which tells the story of the queen's close relationship with a tall and handsome Indian Muslim called Abdul Karim. The diaries add weight to suggestions that the queen was arguably far closer to Mr Karim than she was to John Brown - the Scottish servant who befriended her after the death of her beloved husband Prince Albert in They show that when the young Muslim was contemplating throwing in his job, soon after his employment started, because it was too "menial", the queen successfully begged him not to go. Mr Karim was just 24 when he arrived in England from Agra to wait at table during Queen Victoria's golden jubilee in - four years after Mr Brown's death. He was given to her as a "gift from India". Within a year, the young Muslim was established as a powerful figure in court, becoming the queen's teacher - or munshi - and instructing her in Urdu and Indian affairs.

Queen Victoria and Abdul: Diaries reveal secrets

T he first time Shrabani Basu heard of Abdul Karim, she was carrying out research for a book about the history of curry in the late s. A few years later, while on holiday with her family, she came across a painting of Karim in Osborne House, a former private home of Queen Victoria and Prince Albert on the U. He was obviously someone very special to her.

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